November 11

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Disrupting the Golf Industry While Working Full Time with Ali Marler

By Mimi MacLean

November 11, 2021


Robin Golf Co-Founder Ali Marler

Ali Marler, Co-Founder Robin Golf

Breaking into an established industry can be an intimidating endeavor, however, Ali Marler is on a mission to change that. Ali Marler co-founded Robin Golf to be the next industry standard with golf clubs. They are built for everyone using the same materials as other top-of-the-line brands. Robin Golf hopes to strip back the intimidating process of finding clubs so everyone can enjoy the game and play their best!

“I think a lot of women don’t have someone to support them. And when you don’t have someone to do that for you, it’s really, really hard to hit some of those goals.” – Ali

Find Ali and Robin Golf

LISTEN TO THE FULL EPISODE HERE

Episode Contents

Breaking Into An Established Industry

established industry disruptors Robin Golf
Founders of Robin Golf

Mimi MacLean:
Allie, thank you so much for coming on today. I’m excited to hear about your journey with Robin Golf and where it’s taking off and doing great things now. So thank you so much for joining us. 

Ali Marler:
Yes. Thank you so much for having me. Excited to chat through it. 

Mimi MacLean:
So what I remember about your backstory, you came in, right? It wasn’t your idea. So can you just talk a little bit about what made you decide to finally jump in on the idea and become a co-founder? 

Ali Marler:
The three of us are me; my husband, Andrew; and my brother-in-law, Peter. The idea really originated actually from an issue I had going to try to buy golf clubs. Andrew’s a D1 golfer. Andrew promised me a dog if I learned to play golf with him. So I said that sounds like a deal. He sent me to get clubs on my own, and I actually had a really difficult experience, walked out saying I’m not buying clubs from people who I don’t think respect me, who don’t even have great options for me, and it’s just not happening.

Ali Marler:
That is when the idea originated of building this golf company, and it was really Andrew and Peter. I was honestly so frustrated by my experience that I was like I don’t even want to be involved in this company because I hate this sport. I hate what it stands for and the experience I had is nothing that I really want to be a part of advancing in terms of how the sport is played today. 

Ali Marler:
They started building it and going on and they’d come to me and asked me, “What do you think about this branding? What do you think about this color?” And it ended up that I was like, “Guys, you’re doing completely wrong. This is still nothing I would buy. This isn’t how I’d market it. This isn’t how I’d talk about it. You’re using the wrong lingo.” So it organically happened that they were like, “Why are you not doing this company with us if you’re really the one driving so much of the direction for the company and really the passion behind it?” So I ended up joining them probably about four months in or so and then it’s been the three of us ever since. 

Making The Golf Experience Accessible

Mimi MacLean:
That’s great. So talk to us about what actually is the direction and what you’re doing to make it different. What is the different mission and what’s currently out there? 

Ali Marler:
Yeah. I would say to date for anyone who knows golf, they know that it is very segmented. These large companies are for avid skill-biased golfers, which also tends to skew very wealthy and white male. The approach we’re really taking with this company, it’s really centered around accessibility.

It’s about golf, but it’s more about why are there certain people who’ve been excluded from the game so long and how do we make sure they’re included in the sport? Maybe not because they love the sport, but maybe because it’s really important to be able to get on the course and do business, maybe because it’s a really important way to network with coworkers, maybe because it’s a good way to, I don’t know, go on a date with someone you’re interested in dating. 

Ali Marler:
It really felt like a lot of people didn’t even have the opportunity to take part in the experiences that are within golf. So we’re really trying to increase the accessibility. We are targeting millennials, females, and diverse types of people who are not spoken to date in this golf ecosystem. And that is really our primary focus, as always, are we making this more accessible for those people? It’s not necessarily are we selling the most we can or are we making this the most premium thing it can be? It’s how are we serving this community of people that we really feel are missing out? 

Mimi MacLean:
And you’re doing that by going direct to consumer? 

Ali Marler:
Yes. So all of us collectively have about over 20 years of experience at Facebook and Instagram on the marketing side. So one of the advantages we’ve had is we’ve been able to see and be a part of so many brands as they’ve built up their entire ecosystem and focused on this direct-to-consumer aspect and have learned a ton. We have taken what our clients have taught us and really deployed it for our own company. 

Ali Marler:
It also really allows us to give the best price. So we’re really paying so much because it goes from the manufacturer to a mass retailer to someone else and then to us, and by the time everyone takes a piece of that puzzle, we’re all paying 50% to 60% over that price. So we are trying to really cut that out by going direct to consumer and ensuring that people are getting the best price possible and maintaining that quality.

Going Direct to Consumer & Launching During COVID

established industry disruptor Rbin golf

Mimi MacLean:
That’s great because having the direct-to-consumer, you’re cutting out that middle man. Right? So it’s able to get a higher quality but more inexpensive. Which ways? Is it through digital advertising? Are you working with influencers? What kind of strategy are you using online? 

Ali Marler:
I think we figured out some things that are going to be staples for us and others that are going to change. So digital-wise, we do really heavy Facebook and Instagram and some Google as well. We’ve really seen Amazon take off for us. I’m not going to lie, I was anti-Amazon for a while. As a brand owner, it’s really scary to feel like you’re giving up control of your brand and giving this control to some of these mass marketers.

Ali Marler:
Influencer-wise, we’ve done a few tests. Candidly, what we’re struggling with is generally you’d say, oh, you’re a golf company. Go find people in the golf world that are golf influencers. We are trying to market to a community that is not necessarily golfers or who have not necessarily played before, a golf influencer isn’t going to excite them. It’s not going to interest them. It’s not something you really care about seeing. And so what we’re currently working on right now is building these cohorts of who might want to golf… a lot of what I just mentioned, maybe it’s for business, maybe it’s for business school, maybe it’s for fun, whatever it is… and find what are influencers in those categories who just golf casually that can be a part of the Robin brand and really show what we think this new world could look like? So that’s something we’re actively exploring there from the influencer perspective. 

We’ve gotten really playful with some of our emails. We’re really just trying to engage people and get them to feel more comfortable with this sport that’s so intimidating right now. So those have been our main channels to date. 

Mimi MacLean:
Now because golfing is so exclusive, because of a lot of it you think of is country clubs, right?

Ali Marler:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Mimi MacLean:
So you’re not going to really be targeting country clubs. 

Ali Marler:
Correct. 

Outsmarting Established Competitors By Going to Public Courses

Mimi MacLean:
Are you targeting more public golf courses and is that your alley of where you expect people to play? 

Ali Marler:
Yeah. So what’s really interesting is… my husband will kill me for saying this… but golf clubs, for a lot of us they’re actually not growing. They’re actually the dying segment, and a lot of people don’t necessarily want to join a golf club because of the expense or because of the exclusivity or whatever it is. So the fastest-growing areas of golf are public courses like you said. It’s nine-hole courses because people don’t have the time to play 18 holes, and it’s places like driving ranges or where you can go drink and hit some balls and have fun with people. So it’s what we call off-course golf is actually the fastest-growing segment of golf. So those are really the types of people we’re going after. 

Ali Marler:
When we’re thinking about targeting, we’re really just picking really wide cohorts of people. So right now, our core demographic is really between 24 to 45, I’d say, that middle age, super active, likes trying new things. So rather than really pinpoint are people playing at these public courses? We’re just going after the masses and we’re trying to have messages around more broadly like, “Have you ever thought about this?” Or “Why haven’t you golfed?” Or “What was your favorite memory ever of growing up?” And a lot of people’s memories have something to do with golfing with their grandparents or going out with some friends and running around on the golf course and not playing. So we’re trying to pull on the other areas that people have that relate to golf even indirectly, to your point. 

Mimi MacLean:
So how have you been impacted with COVID and the supply chain at moment? I assume most of your stuff is overseas. Have you transitioned to the United States or, I mean, what does that look like? Or is all your stuff sitting off of LA in one of those shipping containers? 

Ali Marler:
Oh, yeah, you love following that news. I would say COVID has been a blessing and a curse. So what COVID did do… It’s funny. Everyone says when you start a business, it’s all about timing and it’s one of those things you hear over and over whenever you tell someone, “Oh, I’m a co-founder of a new company. What’s the one piece of advice you’ll give me?” And they’re like, “It’s all timing.” 

Ali Marler:
So we started the company and then literally within four months of launching, not even four months, probably two and a half, COVID hits. And I remember looking at Andrew and saying, “Well, they told us it’s all timing and that is the end of Robin Golf.” Because everyone thought this world was imploding. No one wanted to buy anything. Everyone was so scared. And then what happened is people realized that golf is one of the only sports at the time that was COVID safe in terms of distance and being outside. 

Mimi MacLean:
Except if you were in LA where they shut the golf courses down.

Ali Marler:
That’s true, except if you were in LA. But-

Mimi MacLean:
Somehow you could get COVID while you’re walking outside nowhere near anybody else, but…

Ali Marler:
That’s so true. But we were like, “Wow, this could be interesting.” And then all of a sudden it shot up. I mean, we sold out within three weeks of our first order. And then to the point you just made, we were like, okay, we need to start ordering a ton of clubs. Unfortunately, that’s what everyone in the golf industry said when they saw this booming industry begin. And so we started really competing with everyone else who was trying to get things here, who was trying to make massive orders. And China, our factory also said to us, “Look, for the last eight years,” because golf has actually been a declining sport, “we continued to have orders cut.” So they reduced their factory outputs. They closed certain factories, and all of a sudden we were all asking them to ramp up 500 X of what they’d actually been cutting for the last eight years. So the supply chain has been tremendously challenging. 

Ali Marler:
We have also learned that nothing actually goes according to schedule. And to your point, our last shipping container sat on the ocean in Long Beach for six weeks. We tracked it every single day and it never moved. That affects customer experience, so we’re trying to really overestimate the time it’s going to take so we’re not ruining people’s gifting opportunities. 

Mimi MacLean:
Are you out of stock at the moment?

Ali Marler:
We are in stock. Actually, all of our massive orders that we ordered eight months ago have finally hit. So we are in a great place, which is a good feeling because last holiday-

Mimi MacLean:
[crosstalk 00:13:21] for Christmas. 

Ali Marler:
Exactly.

Mimi MacLean:
Yeah. But you’re also focusing on kids now? I remember reading something on your business like you’re focusing on kids or you’re also maybe transitioning to other sports. Is that correct or no? Is that something I’m not supposed to be talking about? 

Ali Marler:
Yes. No, you’re fine. Both of the above. So kids, actually we ended up introducing shortly after we did men and women when we first launched. We rolled in kids. We got a lot of feedback from parents that they were having the same challenge buying clubs for kids. There was only one manufacturer [crosstalk 00:13:47]-

Mimi MacLean:
They’re terrible. They’re like you go in and they’re these crap things for a couple hundred dollars. 

Ali Marler:
Exactly. So those have also been doing really, really well. I will say we underestimated our orders for kids. We didn’t know how much parents would want and if kids were still getting into the game. So that’s one that we will up for next year. But kids do really, really well. 

Ali Marler:
And then, yeah, we were actually talking about this yesterday. We have been going now for almost two years since we came up with the idea. It’s been going really, really well. We did the proof of concept, which was if you think about very retail-driven sports that are opaquely priced and somewhat intimidating to get into, there’s actually a really long list of those. I’m sure we’d all put together different lists. There’s some cross-sections that more people are playing than others. And so we decided to really take this approach that we applied to golf and apply it to other sports that fell into those cross-sections to do the same thing. 

Ali Marler:
The ultimate goal for us is these days, I don’t even remember the last time I walked into a Sports Authority or a Dick’s Sporting Goods to buy sports equipment. So what if we can rebuild what that looks like in this new world and create an online direct-to-consumer driven ecosystem for hobby sports? So that’s really what we are on an mission to go and do, all at the same time while really keeping in mind why we’re doing it, which is accessibility and quality in one.

Establishing a Support System As A Female Co-Founder

robin golf is disurpting the established golf industry

Mimi MacLean:
That makes sense. So I know before we jumped on, we were talking a little bit about only 1.7% of female-run companies ever reach a million dollars in sales. And obviously you guys have reached that in two years, which is unheard of because a lot of companies, it takes a long time to get there, if they even get there. So I was just curious as to what maybe would be reasons why you did get there? Maybe it’s your experience at Facebook that led you to already know what you’re doing. I don’t know. I just would love to just noodle that over with you.

Ali Marler:
Yeah. No, I’d have to say that was still one of the most… I wrote it down because I’m going to carry that with me because that shocks me because I think there are so many amazing women-run businesses. I think there’s a few reasons. Some are more self-driven reasons. I think some are more built by the community you have around you.

Ali Marler:
Starting with self, I’ll say one is it’s a really scary number. When you hear a million dollars, that sounds like a lot of money. So you’re intimidated by, oh, how do we get there and what does it require to get there? And what it requires to get there is making some really scary inventory decisions about how much inventory you have to have to actually sell enough to hit a million dollars of revenue, which also requires conversations of how are we going to finance this? Who’s going to give us money? Are we going to be pulling out 50 credit cards in order to get there? All of which I will tell you, we 100% did for Robin golf and it was really, really scary times. 

Ali Marler:
We had a call when one day with the three of us founders and we were like, “We can’t pay any of our bills right now, but if we keep selling all the inventory we have, we’ll be able to.” So it just forced us to just hit the ground so hard in terms of how we were going to sell the inventory. 

Ali Marler:
I’ll also say from an external factor, one of the most disappointing parts of being a female co-founder has been getting into rooms with all men executives and seeing how dismissed you are as a female. So I am very fortunate that my other two co-founders support me tremendously… we’re all related, so I would hope so… but are also willing and feel comfortable with throwing things over to me if they’re dismissed and just redirecting the conversation to make sure I’m heard. There have been a lot of tables we’ve sat at where I say something and they just turn to the boys and say, “Well, what do you guys think? What do you guys think we should do?” To which they turn around and they say, “Allie’s our CMO. She’s figuring out our marketing. She’s figuring out our sales and this is really something she should be answering and she should be directing.”

Ali Marler:
I think a lot of women don’t have someone to do that for them. And when you don’t have someone to do that for you, it’s really, really hard to hit some of those goals. Because you do just need a ton of support and you need someone telling you it’s okay to think crazy in order to get to these benchmarks. 

Mimi MacLean:
No, it’s true. So do you think the financing that you got was because you have men or is it because of your past experience or your personal contacts? What do you think was the magic sauce that got your funding funding? 

Ali Marler:
Our initial funding, and I will not even lie about this, was a hundred percent we are incredibly fortunate because of how long we’ve been at this company, been at Facebook and Instagram previously, to have a very deep bench of people who not only are supportive but who are brilliant who are willing to take risks and who want to see other people succeed. I think that’s a very rare combination. 

Ali Marler:
A lot of times you’d be surrounded by really smart people, but they’re intimidated by you doing something because you could end up higher on the poll than them, or sometimes you have people who support you who aren’t necessarily able to provide you with funding. And so with the background of Facebook and Instagram, Peter had just graduated from Stanford Business School, Andrew is the king of networking, and then I have a lot of incredible female mentors who truly just want to help you however they can and will open up any door they can to get you there, that’s what our secret sauce was. But we also got I’d say 400 nos and 10 yeses to get there. 

Mimi MacLean:
Yeah. I would say the ratio is usually about like a hundred to one, 50 to one. Right? [crosstalk 00:19:34] how many times.

Ali Marler:
Oh, my God. Yeah. And it could get just very exhausting. You almost second guess yourself. You just have to keep telling yourself to keep going. 

Mimi MacLean:
Right. It’s crazy. I’m so glad that you brought it up because this is definitely one of the points I talked about in the book that I just launched, my How To Be a Badass Female CEO. I just talk about what reasons are holding women back from reaching higher than men in their ventures, and one of the reasons is men tend to get mentors more than women. I think it’s 65% of men have mentors whereas only 30%…I’m not exactly on the right numbers, but just in general, it’s around that, like two to one… of women getting mentors. So the fact that you have mentors, I would love to talk to you about that because I think a lot of women don’t have them because they feel that it’s showing a sign of weakness to have mentors or it’s also probably hard to find female mentors, if that’s what you’re going for. I mean, you can also have male mentors, right? 

Ali Marler:
Yeah.

Mentorship is Essential In Order to Establish Yourself in a Male Driven World

Mimi MacLean:
But to find female mentors, I find a lot of women are either too busy or they feel like I got here without a mentor, I’m not going to mentor you. There’s a little bit of that going on. Or they’re just so distracted it’s not part of their web. You know? So I just would love to talk about your mentors, how you found them. Are they formalized? Is it more informal? 

Ali Marler:
Yeah. No, that’s a great point and it’s something that I am very lucky that Facebook has instilled in us, which is how important mentorship is. I think the misconception about mentorship is it just happens and you don’t have to go out and ask someone and it’s just organic and everyone wants to. I think to your point, most of the time that’s not the case. It’s very serendipitous when it is, but I would say 95% of the time, it’s not. So you have to actually figure out who do I want to mentor me and am I comfortable asking them to and do I think they have time? 

Ali Marler:
So I have outside of work… I had stay-home dad and my mom was a corporate female executive when not only were no women corporate executives but most were the ones staying at home, not the dad. So she had an incredible network of women around her who all traveled the C-suite together. When my mom passed away six years ago, they really took this place in my life… I’d always known them well, but took this place in my life of we’re going to be here for you-

Mimi MacLean:
Oh, that’s nice.

Ali Marler:
… when your mom can’t be. Because she was always my first phone call when I didn’t know what to do for work. And they have been incredible mentors for me. They have gone through so much coming up in that generation of being executives, and they really give me the [inaudible 00:22:03] I need sometimes when I’m just so annoyed or when I feel so frustrated and when I just need someone to pull me through to the other side.

Mimi MacLean:
Are they all on a group text or is that an individual? 

Ali Marler:
Yeah, a few of them are on the same group text. And it’s funny because when I think of a bad story, they’re like, “Do you want to hear this that happened to us 10 years ago?” And they make me feel like we’re lucky to be where we are now.

Mimi MacLean:
Yeah, you are. I mean, in a sense because you’re a lot younger than I am, but it’s even different from when they were… yeah. You just see how much different it has become. So when people complain now, I’m like, “Oh, you should have seen how it was 40 years ago or 30 years ago.”

Ali Marler:
Yeah. And then within being at Facebook for almost 10 years now, a lot of people have left and done really incredible things and built their own businesses and done a lot of the work that we’re trying to do now. And again, they’re all women, but a few of those women I have stayed close with. When we were in a fundraising round and I was really frustrated that we didn’t have the majority of women at our cap table, because that’s really in my mind what I wanted, she talked me off a ledge of, “Hey, you can only do one thing at a time. You’re going to get there, but just you have to build a business before you could change the world like you want to change the world.”

Ali Marler:
So there’s a mix of mentors. But for me it’s really, really important because, to your point, I saw my husband have so many mentors and I just realized it’s because guys are more willing to ask for things than we are. I just had to get comfortable asking people to coach me and mentor me and give me answers to things. But it’s paid off. 

Mimi MacLean:
So when you asked somebody, was it like, “Hey, will you be my mentor or I would love if you could once a quarter have lunch with me?” Did you actually ask in a formal way as such? 

Ali Marler:
For one of them, I did, yes. Because the position she was in didn’t lend itself to just me being able to text her and say, “Hey, could you give me an answer to this?” So I did formalize it where I thought it needed to be. But some of them, it was more, “Hey, I’m building a company. I’ve been watching you. You’ve been incredible and clearly you’re doing a lot of things right. I would love to just be able to bounce ideas off of you when I really stuck.” So it’s much less informal, but I feel like I have that backstop when I need it or those words of wisdom when I do. And then the ones who are more of my mom’s friends who have become mentors for me, that’s super casual. That’s just me calling them or asking them questions. But it’s really helpful to have so many different types of mentors, too, because you feel like you have this tribe behind you.

Working in a Male Established Industry and Her Advice for Female Founders

Mimi MacLean:
Yeah, that’s true. What have you felt like has been the hardest struggle so far in two years?

Ali Marler:
The biggest struggle for me coming from a company that is so female first and it’s so about female empowerment has been the reality of walking into a world that still isn’t female first and still is so male-dominated and still has a lot of those qualities that quite honestly since I started working, I never got to see because I’ve been at this company for so long. And that was really hard for me. I definitely had a few breakdowns and I was like, “Holy shit, this sucks. I can’t believe that this is what people are working through.” So that’s more on just the business side. 

Ali Marler:
Another one that’s really hard is people always think they know what you should be doing, which everyone always said, but I never experienced. So it might seem like we just released something and maybe we didn’t put that much thought behind it, but the reality is we probably thought about that for six months to a year. We came up with the branding of it and everything. And so since that’s really my core role, I didn’t realize how hard it was going to be when people told me they don’t like what I’m doing, or they think we did it wrong, or they think we could do it better, or here’s this and here’s that. So it’s taken to this point to be able to really dismiss that and be able to still focus on my vision and what I think we should be doing as opposed to what everyone else thinks we should be doing. 

Mimi MacLean:
We’re second guessing, yeah. No, it’s true. Because if you want to make difference and change, right, you can’t keep doing what’s already been done because it doesn’t work. And especially because there’s also, from what I found, with golf, there’s like this… I don’t want to say snobbery, but you might say to them, “Hey, we’re bringing these clubs,” and of course, they’re going to be like, “Oh, well, they’re not Callaways,” or whatever. I don’t even know what the most high-quality club is out. You know? So there’s this, I mean, well, that’s not who we’re even trying to-

Ali Marler:
Exactly. 

Mimi MacLean:
Right? 

Ali Marler:
Yep.

Mimi MacLean:
So it’s just changing that. 

Mimi MacLean:
I would just love to close on some advice or any thoughts that you have for somebody who has an idea, is thinking about doing it, or is in the beginning or in the throws of it and they’re like, “Why am I doing this?” Any words of wisdom, advice, tips to give them? 

Ali Marler:
Yes. One is don’t take yourself too seriously when you’re trying to start a company because you know nothing. I was so scared because I’m so type A that I thought I needed to have everything figured out to start this company, and what I realized is even when I thought I did, I knew nothing. And I wish me two years ago was just more willing to get things wrong when I started. I listened to way too much how I built this, and I thought that that was the only way you could start a company.

Mimi MacLean:
And they make it look so easy too. Right? So that’s why this is like dissecting what happened. What’s wrong? Because just listening to you, you’re like, oh, you reached a million dollars in sales in two years. What really happened in that? There were a lot of mess-ups. There were a lot of [crosstalk 00:27:24]-

Ali Marler:
We talked about that-

Mimi MacLean:
… [crosstalk 00:27:25] pulling your hair out. 

Ali Marler:
… all the time. We’re like, “Well, this one couldn’t go into how I built this story because it’s such a disaster that it just there’s no way no one else went through this.” 

Ali Marler:
I think the second is it’s okay to be scared. I also think you read all these books about starting a company, and it’s like don’t let fear drive you and you should just be strong and walk out there. But I think the reality is, as a human being, if you’re taking a leap to start a company, there is going to be an aspect of fear. And it’s okay to be scared, and it’s okay to share that with people. We tried to be so strong when we started that I think we did ourselves a disservice by not being honest when we needed help, or when things weren’t going well, or when we needed to pivot. And I think if we had done that earlier, we probably would have hit our milestones earlier than we did. 

Ali Marler:
And then I think the last one is surround yourselves with people who support you. It’s really easy to have naysayers who tell you a company’s going to fail or something’s not going to work, and they’re everywhere. But you need people around you who are going to say like, “Go do it. Try it out. It’s okay if it takes you a while.” And we’ve been really, really lucky to have those people, and that’s why we’re still continuing to grow and where we are today. 

Mimi MacLean:
That’s great. Allie, this has been amazing. Thank you so much. We love our Robin Golf clubs that we use. So thank you, I appreciate it. And, yeah, so good luck to you, especially this holiday season and as you continue to grow.

Ali Marler:
Thank you. [crosstalk 00:28:54].

Mimi MacLean:
And to find you is robingolf.com. Right?

Ali Marler:
Yep, robingolf.com.

Mimi MacLean:
Perfect. Awesome. Thank you.

Ali Marler:
Thank you. 

Mimi MacLean:
Thank you for joining us on The Badass CEO. To get your copy of The Top 10 Tips Every Entrepreneur Should Know, go to thebadassceo.com/tips. Also, please leave a review as it helps others find us. If you have any ideas or suggestions, I would love to hear them. So email me at mimi@thebadassceo.com. See you next week and thank you for listening.

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